IFUGAO TEXTILES


 

"Ifugao men wear woven cloth bags called butong or butung. These are almost triangular in shape, closed by copper rings and capped by a circular brass handle. These were used to carry pipes, tobacco, flint, steel, betel nut, spoons, even amulets or charms. The butung are tucked into the G-string with the brass handle flopping down flat." (Quoted from R. Maramba, Form and Splendor)

These bags come in two sizes - pinu'hha (above) and anba'yong (smaller type not shown here). A copper alloy handle takda'ng (missing) normally runs through the spiral lidi'ngan. The indigo stripes bagi't cross a knotting boo'ng that runs down the middle. A red supplementary weft kinabáong decorates the lower part of the bag at the right. Tassels ngúme hang down from the bottom.

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, CHICAGO

 

 

Binuhla'n (the be-enemy-ed) type loincloth with very simple embroidered lizards (tina'ggu in vertical position, and binala'bag an tina'ggu in horisontal position), sawtooth embroidery (kutilap) along the lower edges, zigzag embroidery (tiktik-u') at the end, red complimentary weft (kalúmhing) at the end, and floating warp mortar pattern (linu'hhong) along edges. The colours apperar to be mineral dyes from Ilocos, possibly aquired from the Cagayan Valley. The red stripe symbolises the sun deity who is the god of war. The barter value of the textile is a middle sized pig. Size: 25 x 250 cm.

Textiles of this quality are relatively old, probably from the first half of 1900. A similar textile can be seen on Carla Sinopoli and Lars Fogelin's "Imperial Imaginings: The Dean C. Worcester Photographic Collection of the Philippines, 1890-1913", CD-ROM:\DCW\images\html\07\07A025.HTM.

Provenance: Rudolf Kratochwill, 1995

 PRIVATE COLLECTION

 


 

COLLECTION OF

RIJKSMUSEUM VOOR VOLKENKUNDE

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Butung. Collected by Alexander Schadenberg, ca. 1890

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Butung. Collected by Alexander Schadenberg, ca. 1890
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Tapis.

 

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Butung.