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Wikipedia entry on Zambia

This page was last updated on 10.05.2009 16:43

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Photo Gallery - Zambia

What I remember about my trip to Zambia is how spectacular the Victoria Falls were, and these scans do no justice at all, the pictures were taken by an almost seventeen year old Gareth, using an Olympus trip, they have been scanned from slides using a Canon FS-4000US scanner. The trip was against a backdrop of strife across the border in neighbouring Rhodesia, which became Zimbabwe in 1980. The Queen was in Zambia for a Commonwealth conference at the same time

00.07.1979 Victoria Falls

00.07.1979 Victoria Falls

00.07.1979 Victoria falls, sunset

00.07.1979 Victoria falls, sunset

00.07.1979 Road sign, Zambia

00.07.1979 Road sign, Zambia

00.07.1978 Victoria falls

00.07.1979 Victoria falls

I found a report I wrote as a geography assignment in the sixth form, leaving out the boring stuff like geography, population densities, and how open cast mines are operated, etc, etc. This is an almost seventeen year old Gareth’s thoughts at the time:

ZAMBIAN JOURNEY 1979, CHAPTER 3 OUR JOURNEY

We managed during our stay in Zambia to travel to most parts of the country, covering something like three and a half thousand miles, either by public transport or by transport which we hired ourselves. The part of the country we did not manage to get to was the east down by Chipata. However we did go to Kitwe in the copper belt, Nporokosso in the north, Livingstone in the south, Monga in the west, and of course Lusaka in the centre of the country

Our first weekend in Zambia was spent at the Justa Mwale theological college, which we were to keep returning to as a base to start off for different parts of the country. From Lusaka we travelled up to Kitwe by a Zambia motor bus, the best form of transport in the country. It took about six hours to cover the 350 miles, which is very good in a country which faces great travel problems

Probably the three most exciting things we did in the copper belt was to visit the Nohanga copper mine (which I will talk about later), visit the hospital and an area of forestry where pine trees are grown, just as the forestry commission foes in Britain. It surprised me to see miles and miles of coniferous trees growing in a country so close to the equator, as I normally associated pines with cold climates. Of course we did many other things as well, like visit the Kitwe radio and television centre

After a week in Kitwe we travelled back to Lusaka by Zambia Railways. We woke up at 5 o’clock in the morning to catch the 8 o’clock train, it took us until 7.45 in the evening to get to Lusaka – a journey of eleven hours and forty five minutes (roughly the time it took us to get from Gatwick to Lusaka). When we arrived in Lusaka we were driven to Justo Mwale in the back of a lorry

The next day we were up at six to leave on the first leg of our journey to Mporokoso. The minibus that we had hired did not arrive at eight o’clock as we had arranged. After a bit of investigation we discovered it had been commandeered by the Ministry of Transport for the Commonwealth conference. It was one o’clock when we left and we did not get as far as our destination of Chitambombo as it had begun to get dark, and it is dangerous to drive at night. We spent the night in Kabwe

The next day we drove through a town called Kapiri Mposhi and along a road called the Great North Road. The luggage which we had tied to the roof without the aid of a roof rack slipped off a few times. We stopped at Serenje for petrol and this small town could almost been a town out of a cowboy movie, except that there was not any brushwood. We also went into a store called Z.C.B.C (the Zambian equivalent of Sainsbury) where most people stocked up with food and drink, especially bottled Coke and Fanta which only costs about 10p a bottle. We then carried on to Chitambombo

We arrived in Chitambombo quite early and were received extremely well, considering we were a day late! Wherever we went in Zambia we always had a very warm welcome. Often people would stay up incredibly late to meet us after travelling maybe up to fifty miles. After settling in we went to see yhe David Livingstone memorial hospital. There were two doctors there. The one who showed us around was Dutch. The hospital also had forty nurses, nearly all of them were Zambian. There were 178 beds, and an operatin theatre in which minor operations could take place. All the dirty linen from the hospital was washed by hand by the nurses, After seeing the hospital we were given a meal and then we went to bed

The next day, half way to Mporokoso, the engine of the mini bus conked out, and it looked as though we would have to spend the night in the bush, on the road side. However  we were lucky and managed to get a tow from a rig going to Tanzania. The rig took us to a town called Kasama, where we arrived at nine thirty at night

The next day was spent trying to find alternative transport to Mporokoso as the minibus engine was a write off. Eventually we managed to hire a mini bus, and the day after we set off, this time driving along a dirt road until we reached the village of Kashinda where we were to stay. This was the first time we had to rough it. We stayed in mud huts, there were no lights, no sinks or running water, and the toilet was a hole in the ground

From Kasama we caught the Tan-Zam train to Kapiri Nposhi and then we changed trains because the two railways did not join because they are built to two different gauges. The difference between the two stations is quite interesting, the new Kapiri Mposhi station on the Tan-Zam railway built by the Chinese a few years ago is very nice and large. However the old Kapiri Mposhi station on the Zambian railway is just a place on the railway where the train stops. There are no platforms and only a little hut for selling tickets. This was built by the British

We eventually got back to Lusaka and from there we drove to Mongu through the Kafue National Game Park, where we saw quite a few wild animals, elephants, gazelle, zebra

After our visit to Mongu we drove back to Lusaka and from there to Livingstone where we saw all the sights, namely the Victoria falls and the safari park. These were tremendous sights that are difficult to describe, but which I shall never forget.


This page was last updated on 10.05.2009 16:43
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